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Re: During the first quarter this year, this particular grocery [#permalink]
Carcass wrote:
This is a wordy question to confuse the students. However, if you stick out what you do really looking for it is easy.

probably, the most difficult part (at least for a non-native speaker) is to consider all the 3 categories which are mentioned in the question as bakery which is 6%

If we triple this amount it becomes 18%

However, the "jump" from 6 to 18 is 12. So we do have an increase in term of % of 112 which is our new whole amount.

\(\frac{18}{112}=C\)

Hope this helps.

Regards



Firstly, how does one know this is a change question? I was unfortunaley someone completely lost in the thicket of the wordiness of this question.
Secondly, Where does the 112 come from?

I get so nervous with GRE quantative questions that I mess up on what I should know.
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Re: During the first quarter this year, this particular grocery [#permalink]
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Mercychee wrote:
Carcass wrote:
This is a wordy question to confuse the students. However, if you stick out what you do really looking for it is easy.

probably, the most difficult part (at least for a non-native speaker) is to consider all the 3 categories which are mentioned in the question as bakery which is 6%

If we triple this amount it becomes 18%

However, the "jump" from 6 to 18 is 12. So we do have an increase in term of % of 112 which is our new whole amount.

\(\frac{18}{112= C}\)

Hope this helps.

Regards



Firstly, how does one know this is a change question? I was unfortunaley someone completely lost in the thicket of the wordiness of this question.
Secondly, Where does the 112 come from?

I get so nervous with GRE quantative questions that I mess up on what I should know.



hi...

we are given % of certain products that make up revenue for first quarter and we are given that rest all remain same except bakery which triples..

Now let us take total 100 % as 100 dollars revenue, out of which bakery is 6$..
now bakery revenue triples so from 6 it becomes 6*3=18$
and with rest same, the change in over all revenue is 100-6+18=112.. we have added the increase 18-6 to total..
so % of bakery = \(\frac{18}{112}*100\) = ~ 16%
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Re: During the first quarter this year, this particular grocery [#permalink]
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Thanks Carcass & Chetan2u.
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Re: During the first quarter this year, this particular grocery [#permalink]
Hi I'm confused why it doesn't work when we use the numbers given..ie: 6% of $200,000 = $12,000. If bakery sales triple then it's $36,000. I'm getting if $36,000/$236,000 = 15.25%. The $236,000 is from adding the new bakery sales to the original total from the first quarter
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Re: During the first quarter this year, this particular grocery [#permalink]
kimmmmm wrote:
Hi I'm confused why it doesn't work when we use the numbers given..ie: 6% of $200,000 = $12,000. If bakery sales triple then it's $36,000. I'm getting if $36,000/$236,000 = 15.25%. The $236,000 is from adding the new bakery sales to the original total from the first quarter


They haven't mentioned that revenue changed from 1st quarter. therefore, we will take the 200,000 as revenue even for 2nd quarter
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Re: During the first quarter this year, this particular grocery [#permalink]
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kimmmmm wrote:
Hi I'm confused why it doesn't work when we use the numbers given..ie: 6% of $200,000 = $12,000. If bakery sales triple then it's $36,000. I'm getting if $36,000/$236,000 = 15.25%. The $236,000 is from adding the new bakery sales to the original total from the first quarter



Your mistake is that the bakery sales increase from $12K to $36K representing a net jump of $24K not $36K. The $12K of Q1 sales is already included in total revenue of $200K. So you need to adjust total sales to $224K and $36K ends up being 16% of that total.
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